Thompson Fabricating Incorporated
Steel Fabricators For the Waste Industry

CHECK YOUR SPEC!

A variety of manufactures have their own terminology when describing the grade of Roll-Off and Hook- lift containers that they build. To ensure you get the container that best suits your need you must pay attention to detail and terminology. For Example here at Thompson Fabricating Inc. we have 3 grades , Light Duty, Standard Duty and Heavy Duty each are designed for certain industries and applications.

Light Duty (Recycling and Landscaping)

Standard Duty (Construction and Demolition)

Heavy Duty (Scrap Metal)

Some key areas to focus on when purchasing containers are tubing thickness, spacing of channel cross members, and floor and side sheet thicknesses! These all have an effect on the containers structural integrity, longevity and pricing. 

Let’s focus first on Tubing and think where it is and how it is used in a container. Starting from the bottom up most containers today are built with 6” x 2” or 5” x 2” main rails. These are the support tubes that run front to back on a container and are what the supports the container whether it is empty or loaded and play a very important part when the container is being loaded onto either the Roll-off or Hook-lift Hoist.  These tubes that are subject to constant downward pressure and are designed to rest on top of the hoist and support the load. The 3 main thickness you will find container manufacturer’s using is .180, .125 & .375 wall. The most common main rails thickness you will see quoted is .250 depending on the haulers preference the tube can easily be switch without effecting the production process the effect it will have on the container will be the price.

Now let’s focus on Top Rail Tube of a container, this is the Tube at the top of the side walls and across the Front End of the containers, this tube will help hold the shape of the side walls. Rectangular Tubing is used on most Rectangular Roll-off & Hook-lift containers and Square Tubing is used on larger Bath Tub Style containers. The 3 main thickness you will find container manufacturer’s using is .120, .180, & .125 wall. The most common Top Rail thickness you will see quoted is .180 depending on the haulers preference the tube can easily be switch without effecting the production process, the effect it will have on the container will be the price.

Another area to focus on when shopping for containers is the thickness of the floor sheet(s). The floor thickness is usually determined by the application of the container. You may sometimes see 10 ga. quoted on smaller containers that will be used for recycling and light debris. Two of the most common thickness quoted are 7 ga. ( 3/16”) or ¼”, both have certain applications that they serve best, typically you will see 7 ga. quoted on Construction and Demolition containers, ¼” is usually found on Heavy Duty containers that are used in the Scrap metal recycling industries.

 

The last major area of a container to look at is the side wall thickness, with the side walls there are usually 3 – options used and again as with the floor it depends on the application the container will be used for.

12 ga. side walls are typically paired up with 10 ga. floors for containers designed for recycling and light debris, you may also see 12 ga. quoted on C & D containers as well.

10 ga. side walls are very common on C & D containers and offer a higher degree of strength, rigidity and longevity for containers.

7 ga. will be found on Heavy Duty containers and paired with ¼” floors to offer the user a container that is tough enough to withstand the abuses associated with Scrap Metal recycling.

 

So before making your next important container purchase I hope you will take the information from this and “CHECK YOUR SPEC” for options that you may have previously over looked or thought unimportant! Everybody wants to save a buck and price is important but it should never be the only deciding factor as the old saying goes “YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR”!   

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